Archive | Polo 2017-

28 July 2021 ~ 0 Comments

Polo GTI ‘AW’ sport springs and turbo muffler delete released by RacingLine

Volkswagen performance specialist RacingLine has released a series of upgraded parts for the 2017 onwards sixth-generation Polo GTI ‘AW’. Along with a set of sport springs, there is also a new turbo muffler delete for MAF-engined EA888 2.0 TSI ‘Gen.3B’ models.

The sport springs package for the ‘AW’-chassis coded Polo GTI lowers the car by 30mm at the front and 35mm at the rear, and is, RacingLine says, ‘just how it should have come from the factory’. Manufactured in Europe from the same factory that produces many of the OEM springs, RacingLine uses progressive rate springs to preserve the ride quality in normal use, but then stiffen the rates at the ends of the travel. 

It states that a comprehensive development programme gives a ride quality just as good as that of the standard car. There are no official prices available yet – just a part number: VWR31P2GT. Head over to the RacingLine website to find out more.

Turbo muffler delete
Alongside the springs, RacingLine has made changes to its EA888 ‘Gen.3B’ turbo muffler delete (part number VWR160001) so that it now fits MAF-coded 2.0 TSI engines. The turbo muffler delete also forms part of RacingLine’s whole ‘MAF’ intake package which includes an R600 intake with cotton or trifoam R600 filter choice, a turbo inlet elbow, a turbo inlet hose, as well as a coolant underhose.

The turbo muffler delete is CNC constructed from single-piece billet T6-6061 aluminium, with a maximum diameter smoothed internal bore for max airflow. Hand-polished and anodised in gloss midnight black, it can be installed in just 30 minutes. By smoothing the airflow path out of the turbocharger and eliminating the restriction and turbulence caused by the OEM part, RacingLine confirms that ‘a small but useful’ power gain is made.

For more information on RacingLine products for the 2010-2017 Polo GTI ‘6R/6C’ and the 2017 onwards sixth-generation Polo GTI ‘AW’, visit the RacingLine website, or locate a nearby dealer from the company’s global network of retail partners.

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05 July 2021 ~ 0 Comments

Volkswagen Polo was the UK’s sixth most popular car in June 2021

Following its return to the UK’s most popular cars chart in May 2021, the Volkswagen Polo solidified its major player status in June, according to figures released by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT). With 3,752 Polos registered, the small VW was in sixth place, ahead of other superminis such as the Toyota Yaris and the Mini hatch. In terms of the top 10 most popular cars chart for the year-to-date figures, the Polo is up two places from May, and now sits in eighth place with 15,554 registrations.

The Vauxhall Corsa continued its slide from the top spot and was placed fourth in June, with 4,375 registrations. The top placed supermini, the Vauxhall was one spot ahead of the Ford Fiesta (3,811 registrations) while May’s chart-topping car, the VW Golf, had to settle for second position in June ahead of the Ford Puma. The number one most popular car in the UK for June 2021 was the all-electric Tesla Model 3.

Superminis most popular
The SMMT reports that 186,128 new cars were registered in June, which is 28 per cent up from the same month in 2020 when retailers opened after the pandemic. The figure is down 16.4 per cent on the 10-year June average and down 26.8 per cent year-to-date, thanks in part to the global shortage of semiconductor chips. Once again, superminis – cars like the Polo – remained the UK’s most popular car choice, with a 34.1 per cent share. 

The UK’s top ten most popular new cars during June 2021 and the year-to-date (registration figure and position in brackets) were as follows:

1 Tesla Model 3: 5,468
2 Volkswagen Golf: 4,629 (19,608, 3rd)
3 Ford Puma: 4,477 (18,232, 5th)
4 Vauxhall Corsa: 4,375 (24,399, 1st)
5 Ford Fiesta: 3,811 (21,511, 2nd)
6 Volkswagen Polo: 3,752 (15,554, 8th)
7 Toyota Yaris: 3,456 (15,124, 10th)
8 Mini: 3,506
9 BMW 3 Series: 3,048 (15,402, 9th)
10 Kia Sportage: 2,957 (16,310, 7th)

(The 2021 year-to-date top ten most popular cars absent from June’s registration figures were the fourth-placed Mercedes-Benz A-Class and the sixth-placed Nissan Qashqai with 19,498, and 16,842 units recorded respectively.)

2018 Volkswagen Polo Vivo GT

Polo Vivo tops South African charts
In figures released by Volkswagen South Africa, the Polo Vivo remains the new car registrations champion in South Africa, with 11,560 cars finding homes in the first six months of 2021. The sixth-generation Polo was in runner-up position, with 9,045 examples produced and exported by Volkswagen South Africa’s Kariega (formerly Uitenhage) factory. The company also registered over 32,600 vehicles in the first half of 2021, with the 3,893 Polo-based T-Cross compact SUVs registered, more than half of the company’s SUV registrations. Notable VW launches over the coming months include the arrival of the Golf 8 GTI in South Africa.

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30 June 2021 ~ 0 Comments

2022 Volkswagen Polo GTI revealed: all you need to know

Officially unveiled today, ‘a modern sports car in the best tradition’ is how Volkswagen bills the new 2022 Polo GTI. As expected – and shown in the teaser sketch back in May – the refreshed version of Volkswagen’s supermini hot hatch features red detailing and bolder styling than the regular version of the new Polo, and its reveal comes just in time to celebrate the Polo GTI’s 21st birthday in the UK.

What does the new Polo GTI look like?
The new Polo GTI builds on the looks of the refreshed Polo and so already has a bolder and more striking appearance than the outgoing ‘phase one’ sixth-generation model. Up front, a new bumper with body-colour strakes, spoiler winglets, honeycomb inserts and Golf 8 GTI-style LED fog lamps signal the new Polo GTI’s sporting intent, with a red grille strip that bleeds into the headlights – ‘IQ Light’ LED matrix units no less.

The grille itself features an illuminated LED light strip that continues into the headlights, similar to the eighth-generation Golf and Volkswagen’s new all-electric ID model family. A new thinner and more stylised – but still not as good as the older, serif font in our opinion – ‘GTI’ badge is proudly and prominently positioned on the grille.

At the rear, the new Polo’s larger rear lights are a dominant feature and on the GTI feature LEDs and animated brake lights as well as fancy dynamic indicators. As with the outgoing car, the red ‘GTI’ badge sits under the redesigned ‘VW’ logo. A new rear bumper features a subtle diffuser and edge winglets, as well as a colour-coded section housing the twin chrome exhausts. The car featured in Volkswagen’s early press images has 17-inch alloy wheels – 18s are an option – that have a black and diamond-cut finish and on the car in the photos have an almost ‘flower’-like pattern. Which, although they look nice, might not be the most suitable for a GTI…

Available in five colours, the traditional ‘GTI’ shades of black, red, white are available (Kings Red Metallic, Pure White Uni and Deep Black Pearl Effect respectively), along with Reef Blue Metallic – which featured on the outgoing car – and Smoke Grey Metallic. The blue, red and white can also be specified with a separate roof pack, which features a contrasting black roof. Speaking of roofs, a tilting and sliding panoramic sunroof will also be an option.

What about the interior – is it a true GTI?
If ‘true GTI’ means tartan seat trim – check. The new Polo GTI’s seats have ‘Clark’ tartan seat trim but plainer ‘Art Velours’ material is also available, but why would you? We’d always choose the tartan. Another true GTI feature is black headlining and pillar trim, and again, it’s all present and correct in the new Polo GTI. In addition, the colour scheme in the new Polo GTI is based around black, grey, red and chrome.

The full-width dashpad insert now has a gloss Kings Red finish as opposed to the matt finish on the outgoing car, and it’s certainly striking. However, if it’s a little too in your face, a Deep Iron gloss grey option can be had instead. Red stitching on the seats, haptic-buttoned steering wheel and gear lever cover also signify the new Polo’s ‘GTI-ness’.

OK, it sounds like a GTI cabin, but how digital is it?
As with ‘regular’ versions of the new Polo, the GTI’s cabin is more digitised than ever before. While the 2022 Polo GTI’s interior isn’t fully digital like that of the eighth-generation Golf, the physical buttons on the infotainment system have disappeared.

The new 8.0-inch Ready2Discover and Discover Media, and 9.2-inch Discover Pro systems use Volkswagen’s latest MIB3 modular infotainment matrix, the Ready2Discover unit available with an option to retrospectively activate navigation functions if desired. As with the regular new Polo, an integrated eSIM gives the units enhanced functionality and VW’s App-Connect Wireless for Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity.

The new Polo GTI’s digitised instruments are 10.25 inches in size, part of the new Digital Cockpit Pro series of units. The display graphics have been specially matched to the Polo GTI, and the fully digital view can optionally show the navigation route over the full screen, with the functions of the touchscreen on the centre console assigned and used as desired. Sadly, the Climatronic climate control system appears to be optional, but where specified, operation of this goes digital, too, with sliders and touch-sensitive buttons for the main controls.

When it comes to practicality – a traditional GTI trait – thanks to little changed dimensions, the new Polo GTI is as roomy as before. The 2,564mm wheelbase affords the same interior space as the outgoing car, and there is the same 351-litre luggage capacity.

Enough about interiors – what engine powers the new Polo GTI?
As with the outgoing model, the Polo GTI has a 2.0-litre, turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine nestled under its more shapely bonnet. But… power has been upped to 204bhp (207PS), an increase of 7bhp (10PS) from before, although we have a suspicion that this engine was actually already available on very late versions of the outgoing car.

Still a variant of the trusted EA888 ‘3B’ engine, the new Polo GTI packs 236lb ft (320Nm) of torque at 1,500-4,500rpm, and scampers to 62mph from a standstill in 6.5 seconds. Top speed is 149mph (240km/h). Technical highlights of the engine include a dual injection system with combined direct and manifold injection; an engine control unit with four core processors; and an electronic valvelift system on the intake side.

At the time of writing, only a 7-speed DSG automatic gearbox is mentioned. That’s the same as the old car, the much-anticipated 6-speed manual never coming to the UK. We suspect it will be the same story with the new car.

What has VW done to make the new Polo GTI handle like a GTI?
While we can’t tell you until we’ve driven it if the new Polo GTI handles like a GTI, we can tell you what Volkswagen has done to make it potentially feel like one. The new car has ‘Sports’ running gear along with XDS electronic differential lock. Lowered by 15 millimetres over other Polos, the XDS controls the brake pressure of the front wheel on the inside of the bends to prevent the wheel from spinning and loss of control of the vehicle in extreme situations and is part of the electronic stability control (ESC) and traction control systems.

As before, the new Polo GTI can be optionally specified with ‘Sport Select’ running gear. This includes two different damping settings for the switchable shock absorbers, a thicker anti-roll bar on the front axle, more rigid coupling rods at the front and stiffer axle locating mounts at the rear.

Four driving modes – four modes Eco, Individual, Normal and Sport – allow for individual driver settings and preferences and the steering, engine characteristics and gearbox control system are adapted in addition to the Sport Select running gear. While our favourite mode was ‘Sport’ in the outgoing car, the suspension was very stiff. But this is easily overcome in the configurable ‘Individual’ driving profile which still allows for sportier driving steering and noise, but without the uncomfortable ride.

That sounds like quite a lot of tech – is there more?
Yes, the 2022 Polo GTI comes loaded with VW’s latest safety and assisted driving systems. The safest Polo GTI ever, the new model has LED matrix headlights as standard, along with Volkswagen’s ‘IQ Drive’ Travel Assist system which allows partly automated driving. The system can take over steering, braking and acceleration from standstill up to 130mph, using the predictive adaptive cruise control and lane assist functions.

The new Polo GTI has a lane assist lane keeping system as standard, but optional side assist and rear traffic alert, as well as front assist and proactive protection and area – pedestrian and cyclist – monitoring systems can be added. An autonomous emergency braking front assist system is also fitted and includes the automatic city emergency braking function which initiates full braking to reduce the severity of an accident at speeds under 18mph.

Driver alert and automatic post-collision braking as well as proactive occupant protection and tyre pressure monitoring systems are also standard-fit. An automatic assisted parking system can optionally guide the Polo GTI into parking bays and parallel spaces.

Phew! Anything else I need to know – how much is it?
Sadly, prices haven’t been revealed yet. The outgoing Polo GTI starts at £24,155, so we’d expect a modest increase on that. As for availability, UK sales of the new Polo GTI begin in early 2022, but old models – with the new car’s engine! – are still available from stock, should you not be bowled over by the new car’s looks or digital interior… We look forward to bringing you further details, and hopefully driving impressions, of the exciting newcomer as soon as we can.

What do you think of the new 2022 Polo GTI? Let us know in the comments section below.

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22 June 2021 ~ 0 Comments

Volkswagen South Africa produces 400,000th sixth-generation Polo

Volkswagen South Africa has celebrated a production milestone with the 400,000th sixth-generation Polo produced at its Kariega (formerly Uitenhage) factory. The landmark car built on 21 June appears to be a Flash Red Polo GTI – the sixth-generation Polo range has been built at Kariega since September 2017.

Of the 400,000 sixth-generation Polos built at Kariega over the past four years, 326,214 have been exported, the remaining 73,768 cars made for the local market. Polos built in Kariega are exported to all global right-hand-drive markets worldwide (including the UK), while the factory also supplements production for left-hand-drive markets.

‘Proud moment’
‘This is a proud moment for our team, who have proven their dedication to delivering for our customers abroad and in South Africa,’ said Ulrich Schwabe, production director at Volkswagen South Africa. ‘I would like to thank every employee, whether on the production line, in the office or working from home, for continuously striving for excellence. This milestone could not have happened without their contributions.’

So far this year, 61,635 sixth-generation Polos and 10,373 Polo Vivos (Volkswagen South Africa’s entry level model based on the fifth-generation Polo) have rolled off the Kariega lines. In 2017, Volkswagen South Africa celebrated the 1,250,000th Polo built at Kariega, which is situated 1,000km from Johannesburg.

Kariega is just one location where Polos are built. They also roll off Volkswagen production lines at Anchieta in Brazil, Pamplona in Spain – where production began in 1984 – and Pune in India.

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21 June 2021 ~ 0 Comments

2022 Volkswagen Polo order books and configuration open in Germany

The order books for the 2022 Volkswagen Polo are now open in Germany, with the car available to configure at volkswagen.de. All the core trim levels can be chosen – Polo, Polo Life, Polo Style and Polo R-Line – as well as the Polo Fresh special edition which packs in lots of standard features at a price below the ‘Polo’ base model.

One of the most notable features about the 2022 Polo is the standard ‘digital cockpit’, which is fitted to all models, even the entry level ‘Polo’. Digitised instruments are part of the specification across the board, with the 8.0-inch ‘Digital Cockpit’ available on Polo, Polo Life and Polo R-Line models, the Polo Style boasting a 10.25-inch ‘Digital Cockpit Pro’ set-up. Fully configurable with a choice of three displays, the digital cockpits are operated by the multifunction steering wheel.

Alongside the digital instruments, a 6.5-inch ‘Composition’ colour infotainment system is standard on the Polo and Polo Life. Polo Style and Polo R-Line versions get an 8.0-inch ‘Ready 2 Discover’ infotainment system, with two optional 8.0-inch ‘Discover Media’ and 9.2-inch ‘Discover Pro’ navigation set-ups available as options. Additional features include a windscreen-integrated camera for the dynamic road sign display feature.

Online services
Standard features of the new infotainment systems include Volkswagen’s We Connect (unlimited activation) and We Connect Plus (single year activation) online services. Information about the car can be accessed by smartphone from outside it, from the central locking system status – if the car has been left unlocked, locking can be carried out by smartphone – the driving data and parking location.

Volkswagen’s App-Connect system is also part of the on board technology from Polo Life models upwards, which integrates native smartphone apps, including Apple Siri and Google Assistant functions. App-Connect can also be integrated into the Ready 2 Discover infotainment system wirelessly for the first time, as well as by USB-C connection. The Ready 2 Discover system also has a disabled navigation function, activated on demand via the system’s In-Car Shop. A sign of things to come, as Volkswagen transitions to be as much a software supplier as a car maker?

It’s not just the instruments and the infotainment screens that are going fully digital, though. New Polos ordered with the optional two-zone Climatic air conditioning system have an added layer of digital technology as the functions for this are operated by touch sliders and controls, in a similar way to the eighth-generation Golf and the all-electric ID family. A move for the better? Perhaps. While we’ve not tried the new Polo’s system, the digital controls work well enough on the other cars to which they are fitted.

The new Polo range starts at €15,995 for the Polo Fresh – only available in Reef Blue – which just slots in under the €16,795 entry level Polo. The Polo Life begins at €18,475, the Polo Style priced from €22,475. The – for now, the new Polo GTI is coming – range-topping Polo R-Line starts at €23,475. Visit the online configurator at volkswagen.de to see the full range of models, prices and specifications for the new Polo range.

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