Hi! Welcome...

to the online resource for everything Volkswagen Polo.

Find the latest Polo news from around the world, past-model flashbacks, road tests, spotlights on selected models, as well as views from contributors here. If there is a Polo story that you would like to share or if you would just like to get in contact, email us at info@polodriver.com

16 June 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Advanced, dynamic and efficient: new sixth-generation Polo unveiled in Berlin

2017 Volkswagen New Polo R-Line

After months of speculation, Volkswagen has unveiled the new sixth-generation Polo this morning in Berlin, and we are delighted to bring you first details. At first glance, the latest chapter in VW’s small car story doesn’t look that much different to its predecessor, and while it was always going to be evolution not revolution, there’s a great deal more going on under the new, more characterfully-sculpted skin.

Here are the key facts of the new sixth-generation Polo:

  • the sixth-generation is the largest Polo ever at 4,053mm long, up 81mm
  • first Polo based on new ‘MQB A0′ platform with a 94mm longer, 2,564mm wheelbase
  • more space: luggage capacity is now 351 litres, up around 70 litres on the outgoing car
  • five-door only range
  • first Polo with ‘Active Info Display’ digital instruments
  • technology laden: Front Assist, Blind Spot Detection, Adaptive Cruise Control and LED headlights all feature
  • more personalisation: 14 body colours and 13 dashpad colours
  • broad range: engines have outputs from 64bhp/48kW to 197bhp/147kW
  • natural gas version for the first time with 88bhp/66kW
  • Trendline, Comfortline, Highline, GTI, and Beats versions (European markets)

2017 Volkswagen New Polo R-Line

Design
Let’s start with the looks. While the overall silhouette and shape is in no doubt similar to the outgoing fifth-generation car, the new five-door only sixth-generation Polo looks a lot sharper and distinctive thanks to more prominent surface detailing. More obvious flared rear shoulders lead into an arrow-shaped line down the side of the car, which Volkswagen calls the ‘tornado line’.

Heavier lower door sculpting also breaks up the visual bulk on the side of the new Polo, while a more complex front bumper design features more structured elements. A bonnet ‘beak’ extends into the front grille, while the headlights cut through the same line as the bumper join, giving them a pointed appearance as they extend rearwards. The twin-grooved bonnet is also a great deal more curved than before.

Due to the more stretched dimensions of the smallest ‘A0’ version of the Volkswagen Group’s Modular Transverse Matrix (‘MQB’) platform and wider 1,525mm front and 1,505mm rear tracks, the wheels of the new Polo are pushed further into the corners, which, along with shorter front and rear overhangs, gives it a more dynamic stance.

The wheelbase has increased by 94mm to 2,564mm, while a 4,053mm length sees the sixth-generation car become the largest Polo ever. Width is up 69mm at 1,751mm. Luggage space has increased by an amazing 70 litres – 25 per cent – to 351 litres.

2017 Volkswagen New Polo R-Line

The interior of the new Polo takes recent Volkswagen concept car themes and transfers them to a production model. A horizontal design differs from the current fifth-generation car, and sharp geometric shapes lend a more futuristic appearance, helped by digitised technology. The instruments and touchscreen blend into one another, framed by a new dashpad similar to the smaller Up, which can also be personalised with 13 colours.

The all-new Polo also premieres Volkswagen’s new generation of infotainment systems. Using glass-covered surfaces and more digital operation than before, even the entry-level new Polo gets the Composition Colour infotainment system with a 6.5-inch display as standard. And while not as large as the 9.2-inch version on the recently revised Golf, an 8.0-inch touchscreen will also be available.

The optional new generation of Volkswagen’s Active Info Display digital instruments is a small car first. With more information, a more logical structure, and even more graphic clarity, operation is easier, too, with just one steering wheel-mounted button used to activate different graphic menus.

“The Polo is a young, fresh car. It combines charisma with strong technology. No other car offers so much space for its size. This makes the Polo the number one compact, and it will remain number one.”

Dr Herbert Diess, Chairman of the Board of Management, Volkswagen

Engines
A total of nine Euro 6 engines (six petrol, two diesel, and one natural gas) are available for the new Polo. A three-cylinder 64bhp 1.0 TSI kicks off the range allied to a five-speed gearbox. A trio of 1.0 TSI engines with 74, 94 and 113bhp bolster the entry-level unit, while a new 1.5-litre 148bhp ‘Evo’ engine with cylinder deactivation – as seen on the recently-revised Golf 7.5’ also features.

Top of the new Polo tree is a hot 197bhp GTI model – the hottest series production Polo ever if you discount the 2013 Polo R WRC limited edition – which can be had with both a six-speed manual or seven-speed DSG gearbox. The dual-clutch shifter can also be specified on the 94 and 113bhp 1.0s, as well as the 148bhp 1.5.

In a Polo first (but not for the UK) is a new 1.0-litre TGI natural gas engine. Developing 88bhp with a five-speed gearbox, the Polo TGI can, Volkswagen states, be CO2-neutral, depending on the energy source it is refuelled from. A brace of 1.6-litre diesels with 79 and 94bhp round out the range for now. Both are mated to a five-speed manual gearbox, with the more powerful unit available with the seven-speed DSG gearbox, too.

Rumoured electric and hybrid versions of the new car will not appear, Volkswagen citing a lack of market demand and non-recoverable high development costs as the reasons why. Emissions are also thought to be at their lowest in small cars anyway, according to the company.

2017 Volkswagen New Polo R-Line

Trim levels
At launch, Volkswagen is only quoting specifications for continental markets only, so for the UK market, we’ll have to await further details. Going by these first details, though, the range will be very comprehensive.

Trendline
Entry-level Trendline models have LED daytime running lights, a Front Assist area monitoring system with City Emergency Braking and Pedestrian Monitoring, as well as 14-inch wheels. In Germany, prices will start at 12,975 euros, and this offers more value than before.

Comfortline

Move up to Comfortline spec, and new sixth-generation Polo drivers gain 15-inch wheels, a Composition Colour infotainment system, Climatic air conditioning, a Driver Alert system, front and rear electric windows, ’knitted velvet’ seat covers (!), and a multi-function steering wheel.

Highline
A Park Distance Control safety system is standard on Highline models, along with white ambient front door and instrument LED back lighting, a leather-covered gear knob and handbrake handle, as well as 15-inch ‘Salou’ alloy wheels.

Beats
Just as with the current car, the Beats model has a 300-watt Beats Audio sound system. There are also 16-inch alloy wheels, black mirror caps, bonnet and roof decals, and ‘Beats’ badges on the B-pillars. Inside a ‘Velvet Red’ dashpad and sport seats add distinctive flourishes, while the 300-watt sound system can be ordered as an option on other models.

GTI
We’re surprised this has been announced from the off, but a new 2.0-litre, 197bhp GTI rounds out the new sixth-generation Polo range. While power isn’t up that much on the current 189bhp model, the car borrows the Golf GTI’s engine and has a standard ‘sport chassis’ as standard.

A ‘Sport Select’ chassis with adjustable dampers will be optional, while a unique front bumper with integrated fog lights, gloss black trim and a lower lip spoiler help the new muscular-looking GTI stand out. Now a modern GTI tradition, the front grille’s red trim is carried though into the headlights, while traditional honeycomb elements and a ‘GTI’ grille badge also feature. 



At the rear, the new power-Polo gets twin chrome tailpipes, LED tail lights, a ‘GTI’ badge, and a high-gloss black rear roof spoiler. Side sill extensions and red brake calipers display the new Polo GTI’s credentials in profile view. Inside there’s the now mandatory ‘Clark’ check upholstery, leather-trimmed multifunction steering wheel, black headlining and ‘GTI’ gear knob. When it comes to wheels, 17-inch rims are standard, with 18-inchers an option.

R-Line
An optional R-Line package (the orange car in our pictures) with ’Sebring’ 16-inch alloy wheels, a sports front bumper, a rear diffuser and spoiler, and black sill trims is also available.

Elsewhere, the new Polo is the most personalised Polo ever. A total of 14 exterior colours can be matched to 13 dashpad colours, and twelve wheels (from 14 to 18-inches in size), two interior trims and a total of 11 seat cover designs mean the Polo can be personalised more than ever before.

New high-tech options include wireless smartphone charging, LED headlights, an ‘Air Care Cimatronic’ system with air quality sensor and allergen filter and a panoramic sunroof. A ‘Sport Select’ system adds adjustable dampers, while Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) is just one ‘big-car’ option.

Volkswagen is bullish about this new, larger, technology-laden and digital world Polo. Dr Herbert Diess, Chairman of the Board of Management for the Volkswagen brand, said at the Berlin reveal: ‘The Polo is a young, fresh car. It combines charisma with strong technology. No other car offers so much space for its size. This makes our Polo the number one compact, and it will remain number one.’

We’ll bring you more details of the this exciting new chapter of the Polo’s story as we get them, but this first details point to the most technologically-advanced as well as one of the best-looking Polos to date. UK specifications and overall prices still have to be released, but are predicted to be only slightly more than the current car’s £11,970 starting price. UK order books are expected to open in October, with first deliveries in January 2018.

Print Friendly

08 July 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Volkswagen Polo remains a popular choice in the UK

2016 Volkswagen Polo Beats (UK)

The latest Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders’ (SMMT) new car registration figures are out, and we’re pleased to report that even after the new sixth-generation Volkswagen Polo was unveiled in Berlin last month, the current car has remained in the UK’s most popular car chart for June 2017. In eighth place, 4,705 Polos were registered last month, with a total of 27,205 finding homes for the year so far.

For the first time in eight years, the Ford Fiesta didn’t top the SMMT monthly charts, the number one most popular car in the UK was the Volkswagen Golf, itself revamped earlier this year. The evergreen small Ford still tops the year-to-date chart with 59,380 models registered, and sits below the popular VW in June’s registration rundown.

As for the UK market as a whole, registrations were down by 4.8 per cent, with 243,454 units leaving forecourts across the country. That marks the third consecutive month of decline, but the market is still reported to be in-line with 2017 forecasts, the SMMT has said. The UK’s top 10 most popular passenger cars during June 2017 and the year-to-date (sales figure and position in brackets) were as follows:

1 Volkswagen Golf: 8,808 (36,703, 3rd)
2 Ford Fiesta: 8,601 (59,380, 1st)
3 Ford Focus: 8,283 (40,045, 2nd)
4 Vauxhall Astra: 6,977 (32,408, 6th)
5 Mini: 6,630 (25,585, 9th)
6 Vauxhall Corsa: 5,739 (33,560, 5th)
7 Nissan Qashqai: 5,103 (33,574, 4th)
8 Volkswagen Polo: 4,705 (27,205, 8th)
9 BMW 3 Series: 4,264
10 Mercedes-Benz C Class: 4,102 (27,386, 7th)

(The 2017 year-to-date top 10 most popular car absent from June 2017’s registration figures was the tenth-placed Mercedes-Benz A Class with 22,944 cars registered.)

Elsewhere, the In other sales-related news, the Polo reclaimed its second best-selling car in South Africa status in South Africa with 1,897 examples finding new homes. The car that topped it? As ever, the ‘budget’ Polo Vivo claimed the number one spot, selling 2,516 cars. Based on the facelifted fourth-generation Polo sold in Europe from 2005-2009, the Vivo has topped the South African new car sales charts since it was introduced in 2009, when it took over from the fondly remembered Citi Golf as Volkswagen South Africa’s entry-level model.

Print Friendly

13 June 2017 ~ 0 Comments

First images of new Polo revealed ahead of 16 June world premiere

2017 Volkswagen Polo preview

Three days before its global unveiling in Berlin, Volkswagen has released a pair of ‘teaser’ images of the new sixth-generation Polo. The company states that the new model is ‘larger, more spacious and more comfortable’, and will ‘continue the success story of the compact model’: over 14 million Polos have been sold since the small VW was launched in March 1975.

‘Confident and sporty’
The teaser images reveal a front grille ‘beak’, with a fill-in panel which extends the bonnet into the front grille, as seen on the larger Passat. There’s a pronounced shoulder line, too, which is perhaps what Volkswagen is referring to in its announcement that the new car makes a ‘confident, sporty and emotional impression’. 



Klaus Bischoff, Head of Design Volkswagen Brand, explained: ‘This Volkswagen can immediately be made out as the original of its class, but also as a completely new generation. A Polo with an expressive design which makes the compact sportier, cleaner and unique within the brand range. This is a car that fits in perfectly with our times – both visually and technologically.’

2017 Volkswagen Polo preview

Not much given away there, then. But what we can also ascertain is that the overall look won’t be too far removed from the current fifth-generation car, which first appeared in 2009. Revisions over those eight years have kept it fresh, while the new car also borrows the ‘Honey Orange’ paint colour from the limited edition Polo ‘Original’ model, built to celebrate 40 years of the Polo in 2015.

‘Charasmatic design’
Promising ‘charasmatic design, increased interior space and numerous technological highlights’, the ‘MQB’ A0 modular platform-based sixth-generation Polo has a lot riding on its newly-pronounced and broader shoulders. Volkswagen is revealing the car on a live telecast on Friday 16 June 2017 from 11.00am-11.45am CEST / 09.00am-09.45am GMT. If you want to watch live, click the language links to take you to the relevant feed: German / English.

Volkswagen is using the hashtag #VWPolo to spread interest in the new model on social media, and as we sadly can’t be in Spandau, we’ll be joining in, so be sure to follow PoloDriver on Twitter at @polodrivercom during the day. And don’t forget to visit PoloDriver.com for full details on the next exciting chapter of the Polo’s story!

Print Friendly
Tags:

12 June 2017 ~ 0 Comments

A little piece of World RX heaven: second 2017 victory for Kristoffersson in Hell

2017 PSRX Volkswagen Sweden Polo GTI Supercar, World RX of Norway: Kristoffersson

Following his stellar performance at the World RX of Great Britain, PSRX Volkswagen Sweden driver Johan Kristoffersson swept all before him and took his 570bhp Polo GTI Supercar to victory at the 2017 World RX of Norway on 10-11 June, the sixth round of the 2017 FIA World Rallycross Championship.

The win at the 1.019km-long mixed surface circuit in Hell saw the young Swede extend his lead in the 2017 drivers’ points table, and, with 151 points, Kristoffersson is now ahead of current world champion Mattias Ekström by eight points who sits in second with 143.

Fastest driver
Setting the pace in free practice where he was the fastest driver, Kristoffersson never let up. The Swedish driver’s second victory of the year was even more impressive as he was driving in pain, with a badly injured right foot, sustained when it got caught under Sebastien Loeb’s car at a ‘pre-grid’ gathering earlier in the weekend.

A visibly pained Kristoffersson explained: ‘The car needed to be reversed to get my foot back out which was really painful but nobody’s fault. It was really painful between the semi-final and final races, but painkillers helped and I will go to the hospital to get it properly looked at.’

Even a puncture in the fourth qualifying heat couldn’t stop his pace-setting progress, and the PSRX Volkswagen Sweden young gun was also the fastest in the third qualifying heat where he passed Team Peugeot Hansen’s Loeb with a round the outside overtake in the joker on lap one of race four.

‘Really fantastic’
A jubilant Kristoffersson was elated at his victory: ‘It is fantastic. I cannot say it often enough, but our team is rather special. The way we work and achieve these results together is really fantastic. That was a tough weekend. The wet conditions were not easy yesterday. However, my Polo GTI was just superb.’

Speaking ahead of the event, the 28 year-old said: ‘It’s great to lead the World Championship. I was equal with Petter after the first round a couple of years ago but now finally I’m leading on my own. It’s started to sink in a bit more and it’s a very, very good feeling.’ Kristoffersson had never made the final race in Norway until this year.

Team boss and PSRX Volkswagen Sweden driver Petter Solberg enjoyed limited success at his home event. The Norwegian failed to qualify for the final race for the first time this season and finished in seventh place overall. However, a consistent performance helped the ex-world rally star keep his third place in the Drivers’ Championship behind Ekström.

‘So disappointed’
The ex-World Rally and World Rallycross Champion was frustrated at being knocked out in the semi-final: ‘Obviously it’s disappointing that we can’t keep this incredible run going for getting two cars to the final. I have to say I am so, so disappointed with what happened in the semi-final; this is the second time I have been pushed out by this guy in my home race. I don’t know what else to say. It’s not right.

‘It’s been a tough weekend, but still we made some good results. The win in Q4 was really good for me and I was positive coming to the semi and then this happens. But we have to look on the positive. Johan won and I’m so proud for him and for the whole team. We extend the lead in the championships and that’s what we take away. Norway and Hell bite me again, but I’ll be back next season,’ the 43 year-old continued.

Elsewhere in Hell, 2017 European Rallycross Championship leader Anton Marklund finished second in his Marklund Motorsport-prepared Polo RX. Kristoffersson’s Norwegian victory meanwhile was a sensational second win from three rounds, the third in a hat-trick which boosted the Volkswagen Motorsport-supported Torsby squad.

With 285 points, PSRX Volkswagen Sweden is now a massive 81 points clear of its Team Peugeot Hansen rival as the World RX circus rolls onto Sweden for round seven of the 2017 series at Höljes Motorstadion. There’s no doubt Kristoffersson will be keen to make it two consecutive wins as he entertains his home crowd. See what happens on 1-2 July.

2017 FIA WORLD RALLYCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP,

DRIVERS’ CHAMPIONSHIP POINTS

1 Johan Kristoffersson, Volkswagen Polo GTI: 151
2 Mattias Ekström, Audi S1: 143
3 Petter Solberg, Volkswagen Polo GTI: 134
4 Timmy Hansen, Peugeot 208: 102
5 Sebastian Loeb, Peugeot 208: 102

2017 FIA WORLD RALLYCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP,

TEAMS’ CHAMPIONSHIP POINTS

1 PSRX Volkswagen Sweden: 285
2 Team Peugeot-Hansen: 204
3 EKS: 198
4 Hoonigan Racing Division: 166
5 MJP Racing Team Austria: 115

[Images: FIAWorldRallycross.com / PSRX Volkswagen Sweden]

Print Friendly

06 June 2017 ~ 0 Comments

Volkswagen Polo rises four places in the UK’s most popular cars chart

2016 Volkswagen Polo GTI (UK)

The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) has released its new car registration figures for May 2017, and we’re pleased to report that the Volkswagen Polo has risen in the charts to become the UK’s fifth most popular new car. A total of 4,247 examples of the evergreen small VW found new homes last month, while 22,500 Polo registrations have been recorded in the year-to-date.

As in the past few months, Ford’s Polo sparring-partner the Fiesta is top dog once again: 7,617 small Fords were registered in May, adding to the car’s cumulative figure of 50,779 for 2017 so far. This means it still tops the charts for the year to date, too. The Polo’s bigger brother the Golf was in second place during May, no doubt buoyed by the arrival of the refreshed Mk ‘7.5’ model.

While we’d expect demand for the Polo to stay stable for a little while yet, the new sixth-generation model will be revealed later this month. Overall, the SMMT states that UK new car demand has fallen 8.5 per cent, with 186,265 vehicles registered, but still over 1.1 million new cars have been registered since January. The UK’s top 10 most popular passenger cars during May 2017 and the year-to-date (sales figure and position in brackets) were as follows:

1 Ford Fiesta: 7,617 (50,779, 1st)
2 Volkswagen Golf: 5,449 (27,895, 4th)
3 Nissan Qashqai: 4,970 (28,471, 3rd)
4 Ford Focus: 4,455 (31,762, 2nd)
5 Volkswagen Polo: 4,247 (22,500, 8th)
6 Vauxhall Astra: 4,170 (25,431, 6th)
7 Vauxhall Corsa: 4,056 (27,821, 5th)
8 Mercedes-Benz C Class: 4,046 (23,284, 7th)
9 Mini: 3,535 (19,952, 10th)
10 Mercedes-Benz A Class: 3,367 (19,222, 9th)

In other sales-related news, during May 2017 the Polo lost its second best-selling car status in South Africa to the Toyota Auris/Corolla/Corolla Quest, losing out by just 39 units! However, the face-lifted Mk 4 Polo-based Polo Vivo still sat astride the top of the country’s sales charts, with 1,955 examples registered.

Elsewhere, according to JATO Dynamics, the Polo is the third most popular car in Austria so far in 2017, behind family members the Golf and Tiguan. It also shares the same place in Demark, behind the Peugeot 208 and Nissan Qashqai, and also in Germany, where it trails the Golf and Tiguan once again.

World’s most popular supermini
The Polo was also among the top ten registered cars in Italy for 2016, and so far during 2017, the small Volkswagen is – that’s right! – the third most popular car in Europe. With a total of 148,331 global registrations, it is also the world’s most popular supermini, even if those numbers are reportedly down 3.4 per cent. A total of 704,062 Polos were registered in 2016, making it the world’s eighth most popular car, according to the FM Global Mobility Database.

Print Friendly
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

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. More information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close